Category Archives: Pre-service Teacher Education

The flipped classroom article

This is my new post after a long break. There was a serious technical problem about my blog and it took a long time to get it fixed. In my previous post, I wrote about the classroom management course that I flipped. The article describing the flipping process and comparing the flipped and the non-flipped classes has recently been published in the Journal of Educational Technology and Society. Here is the abstract of the article:

Implementing the Flipped Classroom in Teacher Education: Evidence from Turkey

ABSTRACT
The flipped classroom, a form of blended learning, is an emerging instructional strategy reversing a traditional lecture-based teaching model to improve the quality and efficiency of the teaching and learning process. The present article reports a study that focused on the implementation of the flipped approach in a higher education institution in Turkey. For this pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study, a classroom management course in a pre-service English teacher education program was flipped and its effectiveness was measured against a traditionally taught class. Quantitative and qualitative data came from 62 preservice teachers (PTs) in two intact classes randomly assigned as the experimental and the control groups. Findings revealed a higher level of self-efficacy beliefs and better learning outcomes for the experimental group PTs in the flipped classroom compared to the control group PTs in the traditional classroom. PTs’ perceptions of the flipped classroom were also positive.

You can read the full article here.

Flipping a teacher education course

In one of my previous posts, I wrote about Blended Learning and Flipped Classroom.  For the last two years, I have been flipping the Classroom Management course  I offer in my department (ELT).  Last year I offered the course in four sections but applied the flipped model only to one group. I collected data to measure the effectiveness of the flipped classroom against a traditionally taught classroom. Data analysis revealed better learning outcomes for students in the flipped classroom and their perceptions of the flipped classroom were quite positive (I wrote an article about this study and will share it here when it gets published- it is in the process of publication). Thus, this semester, I apply the flipped model to all groups.

Content of the Classroom Management Course was  traditionally covered by lectures. Students came to class having read the assigned chapters and they listened to the lectures usually delivered using power-point slides.  Due to the limited class time and crowded classes, not much time could be allocated for practice-based activities- which are actually must for developing classroom management skills.

Now, in the flipped model, students watch video lectures created by me and shared on Edmodo before coming to each class. All theory is covered in those video lectures. They also do an online quiz that matches the content of the video shared. Face to face classroom time is now spent carrying out practice-based interactive tasks- in pairs or groups- such as offering solutions to classroom management related problems presented in case scenarios, designing newsletters or role-playing teacher-parent meetings. This way, students have the opportunity of dealing with real classroom problems and applying their theoretical knowledge into practice.

To create videos, I used Present.me– an online service that allows users combine online presentations with audio and video streams and create links for the viewers. 

The following is the introductory video I shared with the students about their flipped course.

Here is one of my lecture videos.

I am planning to flip more courses in the coming years as I personally experience its advantages for both my teaching and students’ learning. I also recommend it to all teacher educators who are to offer theory-based courses in their departments.

I finally invite my students who are engaged in flipped learning in the Classroom Management course to share their experiences in and perceptions about it as a comment to this post.

Thank you.

 

The first publication of the new year- Podcasting

Our chapter ‘The effects of podcasting on Turkish pre-service teachers’ foreign language anxiety and attitudes towards technology’ has recently been published as a book chapter. You can view the scanned pages here.

The chapter reports the findings of a study focusing on the use of podcasts with pre-service teachers of English.

For citation, please use the following:

Atay, D. & Kurt, G. (2016). The effects of podcasting on Turkish pre-service teachers’ foreign language anxiety and attitudes towards technology. In M. Rahman (Ed.), Integrating technology and culture: Strategies and innovations in ELT (pp. 152-170). Jaipur: Yking Books.

My Students’ Blogs

I have been offering the Technology and Materials Design Course in the department for the last few years. As the requirement of the course, students (pre-service teachers of English) are supposed to open up their personal blogs and share course related materials there. Weekly, students have assignments such as creating a podcast, preparing an online poster, creating a digital story, etc. (I will write another post later explaining these tasks in detail.) Students upload their products on their blogs and me, as the instructor, and their peers view their posts regularly. Students are also supposed to write an entry for each post to explain the task and reflect on the task completion process. Keeping a blog has many benefits for students. For example:

  • Blogs become their own personal online space- to share their voice
  • They learn how to blog and improve their blogging skills as they keep posting
  • Their blogs become an ongoing portfolio of samples of their work
  • As pre-service teachers, they experience blogging as a student themselves. Thus, they can implement it in their future classrooms with confidence.

When the course is over, I encourage the students to continue blogging. Some of them do. Here are the links to the blogs of Teodora Delibaşoğlu, Nazmi Dinçer, Halil İbrahim Aksakal and Yasin Kokarca. They all keep posting about ELT related issues. I follow them and feel very proud of them. I hope more and more students continue blogging after the course and I can share them with you.